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Trauma-informed practice

This post covers:

  • Recovery from childhood trauma is a lifetime journey by Jenny Molloy
  • Creating trauma-informed and culturally sensitive services for young people by YoungMinds
  • Early childhood trauma and therapeutic parenting by Research in Practice

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Recovery from childhood trauma is a lifetime journey by Jenny Molloy

Social workers should consider how the trauma experienced by children in care will affect their lifetime chances says Jenny Molloy.

‘Sharing and holding children’s grief and trauma is painful but we have to get better at supporting children through this’

Jenny Molloy is a care leaver, patron of BASW England and the author of Hackney Child, Tainted Love and Neglected. She is also a successful Project Manager and Motivational speaker. Jenny has changed career to focus on influencing positive change to the Social Work sector through her experience as a Care Leaver.

Originally published in Community Care, read ‘Recovery from childhood trauma is a lifetime journey’ by Jenny Molloy: here

You can purchase Jenny’s published works via Amazon: Neglected: True stories of children’s search for love in and out of the care system 

You can also catch up on Jenny’s thoughts via her slideshare page: here

Creating trauma-informed and culturally sensitive services for young people by YoungMinds

YoungMinds is a UK charity committed to improving the emotional wellbeing and mental health of children and young people. It is calling on the Government and the NHS to create trauma-informed and culturally sensitive services for young people.

In their latest report ‘Beyond Adversity’ , YoungMinds suggests that schools, social workers, police and NHS staff may be inadvertently re-traumatising vulnerable children because of fundamental misunderstandings about their behaviour.

Sarah Brennan, Chief Executive of YoungMinds, said:

Across the board, services need to focus less on ‘correcting’ behaviour, and more on identifying and addressing the underlying causes of childhood trauma. There are social and financial gains for the young person – but also the whole of society by doing this. Not doing anything makes no sense at all.”

YoungMinds are concerned that children facing multiple adversities are still struggling to get their needs recognised and met by local services.

‘Beyond Adversity’ recommends that:

  • Children who’ve had traumatic experiences should be fast-tracked for mental health support when they need it, even if they do not meet the usual thresholds for those services.
  • Doctors, teachers, social workers, police officers and charities need to improve their understanding of how traumatic childhood experiences can affect behaviour.
  • The government should urgently establish an expert group to improve understanding of adverse experiences in childhood and to ensure that treatment is consistent across the country.

Read the full report: Beyond Adversity

Visit YoungMinds: here

Early childhood trauma and therapeutic parenting by Research in Practice

The fostering and adoption learning resource library, commissioned by the Department for Education in 2013, brings together research and evidence on key aspects of supporting looked after children. The materials are designed to support individuals and learning and development leads to build skills and knowledge for practice and Continuous Professional Development in this area. Read more: here

The library includes a range of great publications, tools and resources on childhood trauma.

Read: Topic 5: Early childhood trauma and therapeutic parenting

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Our mission is to help bring about improvements in practice and policy. Holding children at the centre of what we do through our work with and for them, we aim to lead and promote excellent care and services. The partnership consists of an elected Chair and elected Regional Leads who represent their regions at a national level (two from each of the nine regions within England).

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