Good practice / Performance / Improvement

Trust is an essential element …

#Care #Rights-7

This post was originally published by ADCS on 12 August 2016. Follow on Twitter: @ADCStweets and download the blog at source for free here or via the link at the foot of this post. 

It’s all about Trust

So what do we mean by trust? asks ADCS Vice President, Alison Michalska:

‘Ask someone to define ‘trust’ and you’ll get a variety of answers. The dictionary tells us that ‘trust’ is a ‘reliance on the integrity, strength, confidence and ability of something/someone’. Trust implies depth, assurance and a feeling of certainty that a person or thing will not fail.

Trust is essential in delivering the best children’s services. Trust within our workforce goes both ways – social workers must trust in the leadership of services, and they must be trusted to get on and do the job that they came into the profession to do. The individuals who make up the children’s social care workforce have the opportunity to have a genuinely life-changing impact on our most vulnerable children. They will often find themselves to be the one person in a child’s life who is both trusted enough to understand the problems the child faces and also skilled and confident enough to bring about the change that is needed to address them. 

Read the full piece at source: It’s all about Trust

Referenced:

Children’s Social Care Reform: A Vision for Change

Putting Children First

Our mission is to help bring about improvements in practice and policy. Holding children at the centre of what we do through our work with and for them, we aim to lead and promote excellent care and services. The partnership consists of an elected Chair and elected Regional Leads who represent their regions at a national level (two from each of the nine regions within England).

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