Report raises serious questions about the impact of government policies & financial austerity

In 2016 BASW commenced this Enquiry into adoption in all four jurisdictions of the UK, enabling important comparisons between the different care and judicial systems.

It delves into sensitive and complex areas of practice and takes an approach that seeks to encourage further discussions and debate about improvements.

The Enquiry aimed to create safe spaces to hear the experiences and views of everyone involved. Readers are invited to please respond to the messages in this important report and to keep the open debate going amongst all who have a stake in adoption.

The Enquiry team was led by:

  • Professor Brigid Featherstone PhD, MA Social and Community Work, BA (Hons), Dip Applied Social Studies, CQSW, University of Huddersfield, and
  • Dr Anna Gupta PhD, MA in Child Protection Studies and BSW (distinction), BA (Hons), Senior Lecturer, Royal Holloway University of London.

In a ADCS Press Release Alison Michalska – President of the Association of Directors of Children’s Services, commented:

“This report raises some important questions worthy of further debate, not least in relation to the cumulative impact of wider government policies, exacerbated by financial austerity, on our most vulnerable children and families. Since 2010 local government budgets have been reduced by almost half, at the same time demand for costly child protection services has risen significantly. Cuts to vital early help and preventative services have been necessary in order to balance the books which has reduced our ability to work with families at the earliest opportunity to help them build resilience and prevent family breakdowns. ADCS continues to urge the government to urgently address the deepening funding gap facing children’s services, expected to be £2bn by 2020 whilst reaffirming its commitment to preventative services for children, young people and families”.

Read at source: The role of the social worker in adoption – ethics and human rights: An Enquiry

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