The Children’s Commissioner for England’s Office has recently published research carried out by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) into the levels of government spending on children between 2000 and 2020. The research which comes ahead of next year’s Spending Review, looks at budget changes affecting children over the last two decades. Commenting on the report, the Commissioner says: “I hope this analysis will now help to move the debate on from one simply about the headline amount we spend on children, and to a debate about how we spend it”. The Commissioner has also issued a warning that:

Growing demand for high-cost ‘emergency’ children’s social care leaves gaps in provision for millions of other children …

This important read shows that almost half of the entire £8.6 billion children’s services budget in England is now spent on 73,000 children in the care system – leaving the remaining half to cover 11.7 million children.

Read the full report: IFS analysis for the Children’s Commissioner for England

Please read this latest report from the Children’s Commissioner along with the recently published: Care Crisis Review. Essential reading.

Our mission is to help bring about improvements in practice and policy. Holding children at the centre of what we do through our work with and for them, we aim to lead and promote excellent care and services. The partnership consists of an elected Chair and elected Regional Leads who represent their regions at a national level (two from each of the nine regions within England).

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